Saturday, September 23, 2017

118) Does paper have a future?

With all the digital involvement of artists, you might wonder if there is still a place for paper. I know that for Archiving, the art on paper has a better chance to survive the times. But with all the new generations using digital information without a printed backup you can also imagine these new generation will build tools to access all that digital information too, and the term "Big Data" might also become accesible for the artists and viewers as well. What do you think? Which Direction are we going?

3 comments:

Denny Simonnet said...

Hello je suis le sculpteur des mers sur YouTube est-ce que je peux me joindre à votre blog veuillez recevoir mes salutations artistiques

Martine Latrille said...

Bonjour, oui le papier a un avenir.Quel bonheur de lire un livre, de le feuilleter pour revenir sur certains passages , de l'écorner pour repérer une page, aussi de l’annoter,de le toucher , de le sentir.Le regarder dans sa bibliothèque, ou simplement le poser sur un meuble. Aussi le papier pour écrire une lettre .Malgré le modernisme, je continue d'écrire à des amis en employant du joli papier à lettre soit de qualité ou original.Concernant aussi ma passion le MAIL ART , le papier m'est indispensable aussi pour mes collages.
J’espère vous avoir bien exprime mon ressentit envers le papier.
Bien cordialement mARTine

Anonymous said...

I don’t know the direction of the collective “we”, but for me paper still has a lot of life in it. A lot of my life is still paper-based. Yes, paying bills is so much better done digitally, but meaningful, non-repetitious actions, and deep thinking are best done on paper. A big drawback for digital art, for me, at least, is the loss of perspective. Yes, 10,000 more people might be able to see your art, but how many will view it on the small screens, in a view that is the same as the photos of the children’s birthday parties, their credit card balance notifications, and emails. What does that mean for how they receive the image? For me the art loses something when presented that way. A physical object, in my hands or right there on the wall in front of me is a part of my world at a deeper sense. And even after I walk away from it, it stays with me in a way that a digital image doesn’t as I scroll onwards through the next 10,000 images at a pace much faster (and less attentive) than I could ever view a physical artwork.

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